Lifespan

Learn more about our Lifespan faith development programs

Committees

Learn more about the UUCR committees

Music

The music program here is vibrant and always growing. Click to find out more

Volunteering with UUCR

I want to support faith formation with our children and youth, but I don’t know how to help! What can I do? Click to find out more

There are many way’s to get connected with the UUCR

We are a loving and welcoming community. We offer many programs and opportunities for helping and personal growth.

Lifespan Faith Development

Music programs

Committees

Volunteering at UUCR

Committees

We have some great committees for you to get involved with.
Please click on the committee Title or the + to to get more information.

Action Advocates


Action Advocates is a group of church members who believe that an important way to put our 7 Unitarian Universalist Principles into action is to make our voices heard by our local, state, and national elected officials. We encourage members and friends to meet with, call, write, or e-mail their legislators to urge them to vote in favor of measures that are consistent with our UU values and to oppose measures that are not.

6 Ways to Advocate for Racial Justice From Home
By Phyllis Segal July 8, 2020

The nation’s COVID-19 pandemic needn’t sideline you in this critical fight

On August 27, 1963, I was a sheltered, white, college student driving with my parents to Washington, D.C. to join the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Deciding to go wasn’t easy. Letters to my then-boyfriend (we later married) remind me how we worried about possible violence and wondered whether we’d be welcomed. After considerable back and forth, we decided to meet in D.C. and march together, joined by my parents.

Like us, they had never done something like this before — but they believed in what we’d be marching for, and also that I needed a chaperone.

What Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Said

In my mind’s eye, I can still picture where we stood: under a tree on a corner of the reflecting pool with a perfect view of the stage. I can still hear Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s voice and feel the tears streaming down my face as his words made me see a reality outside my own life experience and inspired me with hope.

“I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.’…. I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”

And I can still remember feeling surrounded by tens of thousands of hopeful, welcoming, peaceful people whose skin color was different than mine but who shared a vision for what America needed to become. Marching that day set my husband and me on a path to stand up for social justice throughout our lifetimes.

The nonprofit organization Zero to Three offers tools for taking action to improve outcomes for babies and families.

Now, at 75 and sheltered again — this time because of COVID-19 — I’m struggling to figure out how to get off the sidelines and stand up against racial injustice. I’m thinking about how I can join with younger generations, as my parents joined with me, and be an effective ally in this fight.

Like so many others, I’m taking time to learn about the history of race in America, history that neither my children nor I were ever taught in school.

But I also feel compelled to take action. As I’ve learned over the course of my life, there are a lot of ways to advocate for a better world. Here are six of them that I — we — can do even while sheltering at home: Read more here.

Who are your legislators? Find the names and contact information on your Virginia and U.S. legislators at:
https://whosmy.virginiageneralassembly.gov/

The VIRGINIA GENERAL ASSEMBLY web page:
https://virginiageneralassembly.gov/

The UNITED STATES CONGRESS web pages:
https://www.senate.gov/
https://www.house.gov/
Your vote is only the beginning. Contact your legislators and tell them what you think. Tell them your values. Tell them what is most important to you. Write to them, call them, or meet with them in person. That’s the way democracy is done.

Connections

Here are the Connections Team event this winter and spring. Please mark you calendars

May 19 Annual Church Picnic at Fishburn Park starting at 11 am.

Nancy Brattain, Committee Chair, nbrattain@cox.net

Connections Team fosters relationships with our visitors, friends and members to enhance their UU experience. Our commitment encompasses the following:
1. We serve as Sunday Service greeters to ensure all visitors feel welcome 2. We are a resource for new comers, providing information and opportunities for pathways to membership. 3. We host and support a variety of church social events.
When to we meet? Connections Team meet the 2nd Thursday of every month 6:30 — 7:30 pm at the Church.
Greeter volunteers: We have 2 — 3 volunteers every Sunday frorn 10:40 — 11:00 am. Greeters work as a tease to welcome, smile, engage, and assist visitors
New Comer Meet- Ups: Twice a year we host a newcomer meet – up after church. This provides opportunity for newcomers to get to know us and each other.
Special Events: Two or three times a year we host church wide social events such as game night and coffee house.
Events coming soon: Intro to UU class, Sunday April 22, 12:30 — 2:00. Light lunch and child care provided. Church Picnic, May 20, 11:00 am, Fishburn Park. Potluck and games after service.
We welcome all volunteers! There is a place for outgoing people persons, behind the scene workers, cooks, organizers! We are a fun Team. Contact Nancy Brattain, nheattain@coo.net if you are interested in volunteering or being part of our Team.

Caring

For joys, concerns, or questions, contact Sally Garber at jcssgarber@comcast.net.

If you have a confidential joy or concern you would like to share with the minister, please put your request in the locked box on the podium. It is located in the alcove next to the name tag board.

If you would like to make a casserole that could be frozen please do and contact Sally Garber making her aware it is in the church freezer.  These casseroles are used for those who become ill or when food is needed on the spot. Contact Sally at jcssgarber@comcast.net

Green Team

NEXT CLIMATE & CLEAN ENERGY RALLY FRIDAY, JUNE 25TH, 5 TO 6 PM
The next Climate & Clean Energy Rally will be on Friday, June 25th from 5 to 6 pm on the corner of Grandin Rd. & Brandon Ave. at the Unitarian Universalist of Roanoke. Our purpose is to remind our fellow citizens and leaders that ignoring the Climate Crisis will not make it go away. Without action it will only get worse. Please come out and take a stand. Signs will be available, or you may bring your own if they support the cause. If you aren’t vaccinated, please wear a mask. E-mail Bob at canyonlake76@gmail.com if you have questions.

GREEN TEAM
Unitarian Universalist 7th Principle: “We affirm and promote respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part”
.

“I AM NOT IN ANY WAY DENYING OR DIMINISHING THE NEED TO STOP EMITTING FOSSIL CARBON. BUT IF WE DON’T FOCUS ON REDUCING CONSUMPTION AND ENERGY WASTE, AND INSTEAD FIXATE ON REPLACING FOSSIL FUELS WITH RENEWABLE ENERGY, WE ARE SIMPLY SWAPPING ONE RACE TO DESTRUCTION WITH ANOTHER.” MICHAEL JOY READ ARTICLE HERE.

 

GREEN TEAM FACEBOOK: FACEBOOK PAGE

GREEN TEAM & OTHER VIRGINIA NEWS & EVENTS:

The Unitarian Universalist Church of Roanoke is a partner of the Virginia Conservation Network. Please visit the VCN webpage at: VCN web page

VISIT ROANOKE AREA INTERFAITH STEWARDS OF THE EARTH HERE: WEBSITE

VISIT THE SUSTAINABLE ROANOKE WEBSITE: SUSTAINABLE ROANOKE WEBSITE
VISIT THE VIRGINIA CHAPTER OF THE SIERRA CLUB: WEBSITE

OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS & INFO:

TOO MUCH POWER
If we modern humans are, in effect, addicted to power, perhaps we need something like a collective twelve-step program. Do some people have too much power over others? Do we humans have too much power over the natural world? These questions get to the heart of our biggest global problems. They also force us to think critically about the way society is organized, and about our own behavior. We often tend to give knee-jerk answers, but too much is at stake for that. We need to think critically and contextually. Read full article here

HOW MANY TIMES CAN PLASTIC BE RECYCLED?
The seven types of plastic vary in their recycling potential. Read article here

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST MINISTRY FOR EARTH EVENTS THIS WEEK: VIEW EVENTS HERE

A SOLUTION TO WORLD HUNGER?

Watch the 8:19 video here: view video here

FOOD WASTE IS HEATING UP THE PLANET. IS DUMPSTER-DIVING BY APP A SOLUTION?
38 million people are buying “mystery bags” to curb climate change.
Lucie Basch knew that people threw away food that was perfectly good to eat — bananas with a few black dots on the peel, cans of beans just past the expiration date. But when she started working at Nestlé’s factories in the United Kingdom in 2014, she realized the world had a big problem. Much of the food she saw go down the production line — chocolate bars, coffee capsules, and cereals — would never be eaten.

One-third of the food produced worldwide, Basch learned, ends up rotting in fields, the back of people’s fridges, or in the dump. It’s an urgent problem for the climate: Food waste accounts for as much as 10 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions. Decomposing food releases so much methane that if food waste were a country, its emissions would make it the world’s third-worst polluter, behind China and the United States.
READ MORE HERE

YOUTUBE VIDEO: “IS SOY HEALTHY”? EXPERT REVIEWS THE SCIENCE | THE EXAM ROOM.

THE AMERICAN INFRASTRUCTURE, ANCIENT ROME AND ‘LIMITS TO GROWTH’

Infrastructure is the talk of the town in Washington, D.C. where I now live and with good reason. The infrastructure upon which the livelihoods and lives of all Americans depends is in sorry shape. The American Society of Civil Engineers 2021 infrastructure report card gives the United States an overall grade of C minus.

Everyone in Washington, yes, everyone, believes some sort of major investment needs to be made in our transportation, water, and sewer systems which have been sorely neglected. There are other concerns as well about our energy infrastructure and our communications infrastructure—both of which are largely in private hands. The wrangling over how much will be spent and on what is likely to go on for months.

What won’t be talked about is that the cost of maintaining our infrastructure is rising for one key reason: There’s more it every day. We keep expanding all these systems so that when they degrade and require maintenance and replacement, the cost keeps growing. Read full article here.

 

THE NEW U.S. CLIMATE NORMALS ARE HERE. WHAT DO THEY TELL US ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE?

Every 10 years, NOAA releases an analysis of U.S. weather of the past three decades that calculates average values for temperature, rainfall and other conditions.  That time has come again. Read article here.

CLIMATE & CLEAN ENERGY RALLY, APRIL 24, 2021

Racial Justice Team

Vision

The Unitarian Universalist Church of Roanoke will become an anti-racist congregation.

Mission

The Racial Justice Team’s mission is to facilitate the evolution of UUCR into an anti-racist congregation which sees racial justice activity as a natural expression of our tradition’s values and beliefs and is committed to building a racially just and loving world. Through programs at UUCR and within the community at large, we seek to promote understanding of white supremacy and its consequences and to advance racial justice in our congregation and community.

Anti-Racism Rubric for UU Congregations

In our work to facilitate movement of our congregation toward anti-racism, we plan to reference a tool titled “Racial Justice in UU Congregations,” which was created by Julica Hermann de la Fuente using materials (with permission) from Rev. Ashley Horan at the MN UU Social Justice Alliance, Rev. Leslie Takahashi, and the Dismantling Racism Resource Book.

https://www.uusc.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Anti-Racism-Rubric-for-UU-Congregations.pdf

We invite all UUCR congregants and groups to review this document and reflect on where each of our various ministries might currently find itself on the continuum from “status quo” to “multi culturally aware” to “anti-racist.”

Our Tradition’s Principles

Putting our Unitarian Universalist principles into action in our church and our community we affirm:

Principle 1-The inherent worth and dignity of every person.

Principle 2-Justice, equality, and compassion in human relations.

Principle 6-The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all.

Principle 7-Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.

History

On February 18, 2018, UUCR became one of many UU congregations across the country to hold a White Supremacy Teach-In. In the following months, several members of the teach-in planning group met to discuss how they might continue anti-racism work in the church and ultimately formed the UUCR Racial Justice Team. We developed vision and mission statements, met with UUCR’s professional and lay leadership to explore ways to incorporate an anti-racist perspective into all church programs, and developed a second White Supremacy Teach-In, held on November 11, 2018. Find the on-line resources used in the teach-ins at these links:

White Supremacy Teach-In 2/2018

White Supremacy Teach-In 11/2018

UUCR’s Pledge To End Racism Initiative

In early 2019, we identified The Pledge to End Racism program as our primary strategy to facilitate UUCR’s evolution to an anti-racist congregation. With the support of UUCR’s Board, we entered into a partnership with the program administrators at First Unitarian Universalist Church of Richmond to bring the program to Roanoke. We also entered into an exciting partnership with Williams Memorial Baptist Church to work together to implement the program in our community. The Pledge Leadership Team, including members of UUCR and Williams Memorial, leads the joint work of our congregations in this effort. On November 1-2, 2019, our first facilitator training was held and on November 3, 2019, our two congregations shared in a Pledge to End Racism worship service at Williams Memorial, with over 100 people from both churches in attendance. The service was led by Rev. Dr. David Jones, Pastor at Williams Memorial, and Annette Marquis, Pledge to End Racism program administrator. After the service, congregants were invited to sign the Pledge to End Racism.

The next step was to implement the Living the Pledge Workshop, one of the most important programs of the Pledge to End Racism. The workshop is designed to help people move from the individual action of signing the Pledge into collective action to dismantle racism. Our first Living the Pledge Workshop was held in February, 2020, as part of the training for volunteer leaders and facilitators from UUCR and Williams Memorial Baptist Church. We were then ready to offer Living the Pledge Workshops to congregants of both churches. A workshop scheduled for May, 2020, had to be postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but as soon as circumstances allow, workshops will resume and will be offered at least twice each year.

The Pledge to End Racism–adapted from the Birmingham Pledge

I believe that every person has worth as an individual. I believe that every person is entitled to dignity and respect, regardless of race or color. I believe that every thought and every act of racial prejudice is harmful; if it is my thought or act, then it is harmful to me as well as to others. Therefore, from this day forward, I will strive daily to eliminate racial prejudice from my thoughts and actions. I will discourage racial prejudice by others at every opportunity. I will treat all people with dignity and respect. I will commit to working with others to transform my church and community into a place that treats people of all races, ethnicities, and cultures with justice, equity, and compassion, and I will strive daily to honor this pledge, knowing that the world will be a better place because of my effort.

More information about the Pledge to End Racism can be found at:

The Pledge to End Racism

Racial Justice Team Members

Dotsy Clifton, Lorraine Fleck, Dana Martin, Teresa Poole, Joan Wages

If you have questions about the Racial Justice Team, need additional information or have information which you would like to share, please contact us at: racialjusticeteam@uuroanoke.org 

Selected Resources on Racial Justice

Suggested Reading List 
Suggested Readings On Racial Justice Sep 13 20 (2).docx    
Contains selected readings that provide education and increased awareness of the personal experiences of African Americans and people of color along with data and information on systemic racism in America.
Unitarian Universalist Anti-Racism Resources    
 Selected UUA Anti-Racism Resources Sep 13 20.docx  
Organizations and documents from the Unitarian Universalist Association (uua.org) focusing on anti-racism.
Racial Justice Organizations
  Website-Organizations Involved in Racial Justice Sep 12 20.docx                              
Local and national organizations involved in racial justice work.
Videos on Racial Justice  
Website-Videos Sep 12 20.docx                                          
Evolving list of movies and other sources for media content for educational purposes.
Local Black Owned Businesses    
 Website-Black Owned Businesses Sep 13 20.docx                                  
Local businesses owned by African Americans.
   

 

 

Reading Seeds

In the City of Roanoke, almost one in three children lives in poverty. Three quarters of students qualify for free and reduced lunch. One in five kindergarteners arrives at school already behind on skills needed to learn to read. Nationally, an estimated 61% of low-income families do not have books in their homes and 80% of low-income 3rd graders do not read on grade-level. Children who are not reading on grade level by third grade are 13 times more likely to drop out of high school.

Reading Seeds, a mission of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Roanoke, promotes literacy and a love of reading for neighborhood at-risk youth. We work with four city elementary schools—Grandin Court, Fishburn Park, Wasena, and Virginia Heights—as well as TAP Head Start’s Raleigh Court Child Development Center.

Volunteers read in classrooms at Wasena and Head Start on a weekly basis. Reading Seeds distributes books at Head Start and partners with Congregations in Action’s Pack-A-Snack program for elementary school children to include a new book two weekends a month.


Support

With your help, Reading Seeds can continue to give new, age-appropriate books to 168 at-risk infants and children each month.

  • $25 buys books for eight children
  • $50 buys books for 17 children
  • $100 buys books for 33 children
  • $200 buys books for 66 children

Please make checks payable to UUCR and indicate Reading Seeds on the memo line. Mail donations to:

Reading Seeds
Unitarian Universalist Church of Roanoke
2015 Grandin Rd., Roanoke, VA 24015

If you would like a receipt for tax purposes, be sure to include your name and mailing address with your donation.


Volunteer

Reading Seeds is staffed completely by volunteers. If you are interested in getting involved, email readingseeds@uuroanoke.org. We could use folks to help us with the following:

  • external communications and public relations, including social and traditional media
  • communications with supporters and stakeholders
  • fundraising
  • grant writing
  • record keeping
  • volunteer recruitment
  • reading in classrooms or one-on-one with children
  • special events and administrative tasks (great for those whose schedules do not allow an ongoing commitment)

Frequently Asked Questions

Where do you get your books and how much do they cost?
We order books from First Book Marketplace. All of their selections are either paperback or board books and average $3.00/book.

Can I donate second-hand books?
Reading Seeds can only distribute new books to the children in our program; however, you can donate used books to the Roanoke City Public Library, Roanoke County Public Library, or the Roanoke Valley AAUW book sales.

How do you fund the program?
Most of our support comes from contributions by members and friends of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Roanoke, a grant from the Dorothy Koch Family Foundation, and an in-kind donation from Star City Reads. We have several fundraisers each year and will continue to apply for grants in the future.

Where do you get your volunteers?
All of our current volunteers are members or friends of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Roanoke.

Have other questions?
Email us at readingseeds@uuroanoke.org.

Need to edit this one Shared Ministry Committee (SMC)

In the City of Roanoke, almost one in three children lives in poverty. Three quarters of students qualify for free and reduced lunch. One in five kindergarteners arrives at school already behind on skills needed to learn to read. Nationally, an estimated 61% of low-income families do not have books in their homes and 80% of low-income 3rd graders do not read on grade-level. Children who are not reading on grade level by third grade are 13 times more likely to drop out of high school.

Reading Seeds, a mission of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Roanoke, promotes literacy and a love of reading for neighborhood at-risk youth. We work with four city elementary schools—Grandin Court, Fishburn Park, Wasena, and Virginia Heights—as well as TAP Head Start’s Raleigh Court Child Development Center.

Volunteers read in classrooms at Wasena and Head Start on a weekly basis. Reading Seeds distributes books at Head Start and partners with Congregations in Action’s Pack-A-Snack program for elementary school children to include a new book two weekends a month.


Support

With your help, Reading Seeds can continue to give new, age-appropriate books to 168 at-risk infants and children each month.

  • $25 buys books for eight children
  • $50 buys books for 17 children
  • $100 buys books for 33 children
  • $200 buys books for 66 children

Please make checks payable to UUCR and indicate Reading Seeds on the memo line. Mail donations to:

Reading Seeds
Unitarian Universalist Church of Roanoke
2015 Grandin Rd., Roanoke, VA 24015

If you would like a receipt for tax purposes, be sure to include your name and mailing address with your donation.


Volunteer

Reading Seeds is staffed completely by volunteers. If you are interested in getting involved, email readingseeds@uuroanoke.org. We could use folks to help us with the following:

  • external communications and public relations, including social and traditional media
  • communications with supporters and stakeholders
  • fundraising
  • grant writing
  • record keeping
  • volunteer recruitment
  • reading in classrooms or one-on-one with children
  • special events and administrative tasks (great for those whose schedules do not allow an ongoing commitment)

Frequently Asked Questions

Where do you get your books and how much do they cost?
We order books from First Book Marketplace. All of their selections are either paperback or board books and average $3.00/book.

Can I donate second-hand books?
Reading Seeds can only distribute new books to the children in our program; however, you can donate used books to the Roanoke City Public Library, Roanoke County Public Library, or the Roanoke Valley AAUW book sales.

How do you fund the program?
Most of our support comes from contributions by members and friends of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Roanoke, a grant from the Dorothy Koch Family Foundation, and an in-kind donation from Star City Reads. We have several fundraisers each year and will continue to apply for grants in the future.

Where do you get your volunteers?
All of our current volunteers are members or friends of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Roanoke.

Have other questions?
Email us at readingseeds@uuroanoke.org.

Stewardship & Generosity Team

More information to come soon!

Welcoming Congregation Committee

We know that religious spaces haven’t always been welcoming places for all people, especially when it comes to gender and sexuality. We are out to change that. For 25 years, we have worked hard to make sure lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer people are full members of our faith communities. Being welcoming means striving for radical inclusion, and creating spaces that honor every part of our identities, backgrounds, and experiences.

How Do We Practice Welcome?

Welcome is a spiritual practice. It takes constant doing and stretching for our welcome to grow. We practice welcome in our congregations by:
• Promoting inclusivity and using inclusive language
• Creating Welcoming spaces, including gender-neutral bathrooms
• Speaking our Welcome out loud and in print and online
• Building our Welcoming skills as congregational leaders and greeters
• Deepening our understanding of identities that differ from our own
• Offering sexuality education for the entire lifespan
• Preventing discrimination in the process of hiring a minister
• Engaging in justice ministry in our communities and the wider world
• Regularly engaging in Welcoming Congregation programming and ministry

Worship Weavers

More information to come soon!

Committee Chairs


Sunday Services                                  Anna Tulou Orr                     annatulou@gmail.com

Building Rentals                                 Judy Granger                     JGranger@uuroanoke.org

Connections                                         Nancy Brattain                             nbrattain@cox.net

Caring                                                     Sally Garber                        jcssgarber@comcast.net

Sharing Ministry (SMC)                      Jerry Trammell                      rammejm@gmail.com

Green Team                                           Bob Egbert                      Canyonlake76@gmail.com

Racial Justice                                         Teresa Poole                    teresapoole1948@gmail.com

Lifespan Faith Development

For more information on the programs in the slideshow, feel free to download our prospectus in PDF format. The links on the page are click-able!

Intergenerational Project:
Lend Your Voice!

  • Before April 1, 2021, visit uuroanoke.org/gmlib to express your interest in the project
  • Fill out the form to express your interest and preferred type of contribution
  • Start writing or planning, keeping in mind that all submissions must be original work due to copyright laws.
  • When contacted, submit your contribution via the instructions given – different media types will be funneled in different directions

This semester-long project (February 1 to May 31) can use every voice in the congregation.

Keep in Touch with Remind

Joining Remind is as easy as sending a text or clicking a link!
To join by text, send the corresponding code(s) below to 81010.
If it is your first time using Remind, you will be prompted to select your role and give a little bit of information. Your role will be P for Parent or S for Student. It is safe for grades 6 and up to be on Remind if a parent chooses to add them.

Class codes:
PreSchool – @uucrpre
K-2nd – @uucrk2
3rd – 5th – @uucr35
MSYG (6th-8th) – @uucrmsyg
YRUU (9th-12th) – @uucryruu
Young Adult (ages 18-35) & Campus Ministry – @uucryac
Adult Religious Education – @uucrad

OR you can simply click the corresponding link below! There is also a tutorial link if you need more help from Remind themselves.

PreSchool
K-2nd
3rd-5th
MSYG (6th-8th)
YRUU (9th+)
YA/Campus Ministry
Adult Religious Education
Tutorial

Lifespan Faith Development Goals

• Catalyze and nurture learning and growth for all ages
• Foster religious literacy and our individual and congregational UU identity
• Provide relevant, inclusive, multigenerational faith development opportunities
• Act as individuals to develop our social conscience and take compassionate steps to love our faith in community

Accessibility, Inclusion, and Safety

We strive to provide safe, welcoming, and courageous spaces for people of all backgrounds and abilities. We are working on a long-term plan to provide comprehensive access to classrooms on the second floor. In the short-term we have ground floor classroom space available for Sunday RE classes and weekly programs. UUCR has a two background-checked adult policy for all work with minors as part of an overall child abuse prevention policy, in addition to clear policies and procedures for childcare, behavior, visitors, safety, and emergencies.

MUSIC

Music at UUCR

Welcome to the music page of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Roanoke.  The music program here is vibrant and always growing.  The choir, led by our Music Director, Kerry Morgiewicz, sings at least twice a month during Sunday services and a few times a year at other special events. We also have a children’s choir.  The children sing in Sunday services every few months as well as during the Christmas Eve service.  Some Sundays feature music provided by guest musicians, our Music Director.  We are not only about singing.  Choir is a wonderful way to get to know other church members.  We have several social events each year.  Please explore the rest of this page, and view our image gallery at the bottom to find out more about our music program.

This 25-30 member group meets Wednesdays from 7:15 to 9:00 in the sanctuary.  We rehearse at 10:00 am on the Sundays that we sing.  Our diverse repertoire ranges from Renaissance to Opera, from folk songs to gospel, from music theater to the Beatles.  We also love multi-cultural music and enjoy the challenge of singing in new styles and languages.  We bring in local musicians to add variety and spice to our exciting array of musical genres.  Please click here to view the choir calendar.  For links to the pieces we are working on, email Kerry Morgiewicz at kmogiwi@gmail.com.

UUCR Children’s Choir

The children’s choir meets as scheduled.  This group is made up of children of all ages.  Our children sing pop songs, folk songs, hymns, and even partner with the adults from time to time.  If your child is interested in singing, email Kerry at kmogiwi@gmail.com

The Every-Once-in-a-While Choir
This is a new music ministry catering to those who love to sing, but who do not want to make the weekly commitment to join the choir.  This is also a great way to practice singing skills in a relaxed atmosphere without worrying about harmony or complex rhythms.  This group performs two or three times a year at the convenience of all.  Kerry is also the contact. kmogiwi@gmail.com

Concerts  
We have several concerts per year at UUCR.  These feature local and regional musicians of exceptional quality.  Past concerts have included violin and piano, Latin jazz, Polish song, and Broadway.

Troubadours  
Our newest musical ministry is spearheaded by Marc Nevin.  Marc has a passion for Unitarian Universalist musicians who write and perform in the folk tradition.

Volunteering with UUCR

It takes a lot of work to build community!

Please contact Judy to learn about weekly service opportunities with A/V, Coffee, Greeters, Kitchen, Life Lines, Recycling, and Ushers.

Please contact Bonnie to get involved with Faith Development for all ages.

Watch below for upcoming service and community opportunities


I want to support faith formation with our children and youth, but I don’t know how to help! What can I do?

There are many meaningful ways to get involved!:

  • Our core guides commit to serve on a team for one age group for an average of 2 Sundays per month. Our core guides provide the stability and consistency to nurture group development and covenant-building to serve the spiritual needs of one class throughout the semester.
  • Our complementary guides support Sunday group work in our classrooms with a commitment of as little as one Sunday per month. Our kids love seeing new faces and hearing new perspectives.
  • Youth advisors show up to support  high school or middle school youth events that typically fall outside of worship times. Our youth are motivated by the call to social justice, and meet sometimes at church and sometimes elsewhere in the community.
  • Childcare providers spend Sunday mornings playing and building friendships with our wee ones in the Nursery. They receive compensation for their time.
  • There are also many support roles for leadership development, classroom preparations, curriculum development, activity guides, mentors, playmates, event planning and execution, and much more. The sky is the limit! Let us know your ideas for child and adult programs you’d like to bring to life!

To explore more, please contact Bonnie.

FROM YOUR RECYCLING TEAM: Help Make UUCR Greener!

Looking for an easy way to participate in UUCR’s efforts to be as green as possible? Join the Recycling Team! Recyclers spend 10-15 minutes after the church service on four or five Sundays per year making sure that waste in the kitchen, foyer, fellowship hall, and classrooms is properly sorted into recycling and trash, and that recyclables are placed in the appropriate bin behind the church. We provide all new recruits with a brief training to answer any questions.
If you can help, please contact Mary Harshfield
From UUCR’s Green Team

See detailed information on the Green Team’s home page or contact:
Bob Egbert

PACK-A-SNACK NEWS

School has started, so 88 children at four city elementary schools need our help to take home healthy snacks for the weekend and holidays. Currently, we need juice boxes, individual microwaveable mac & cheese, individual microwaveable packs of oatmeal (come 8-10/box), cereal/protein bars, peanut butter cracker packs, and individual cereal cups. Your donation goes in the blue tub on the bottom shelf of the kitchen island. Thanks in advance for answering the call.

Bonnie Evans
Lifespan Faith Development Administrator
Message Bonnie